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October 2014
04
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sixpenceee:

thewritingcafe:

Another Halloween themed post.
Part I: Superstitions
GHOSTS AND SPIRITS
Iron and Ghosts
The Early Ghost
Guide to Ghosts
Ghosts
Gravestone Symbolism
10 Little Known Mysterious Ghost Types
Ghost Types
The Different Types of Ghosts
Haunted Places
Cemetery Folklore
Writing a Ghost Story
Tips for Writing Ghost Stories
Ghost Cliches
Horror Cliches
ZOMBIES
The Science of Zombies
Zombie Biology
Zombie Sociology
Zombie Myths
Stage II and Stage III Zombies (pictures)
Vampires vs Zombies
Undead Creatures
Zombies
Guide on Zombies
SHAPE SHIFTERS AND HOMINIDS
Werewolves and other were-beasts
The Shape Shifting Process
Shape Shifters
Hominids of the World
Werewolf Myths
Science of Werewolves
Werewolf Behavior
Werewolves vs Vampires vs Zombies
Werewolf Anatomy
Wolf Body Language
Lycanthropy
Werewolf Myths and Truths
History of the Werewolf Legend
SEA CREATURES
The Mermaid
Sea Creatures
Books About Mermaids and Sea Folklore
Sea Creatures: Books
YA Mermaid Novels
Best Mermaid Books
Awesome Mermaid Books
Mermaid Anatomy
A Dissection of Mermaid Anatomy
VAMPIRES
African Vampires
Writing the A-Typical Vampire
So You Want to Write a Vampire Novel
Avoiding Vampire Cliches
Vampire Cliches
Vampire Burial
Vampire Mythology
Vampire Biology
Vampire Virology
Vampire Sociology
Vampires in Folklore and Literature
AVIAN CREATURES
Underused Bird Mythologies
FAIRIES AND FAE
Types of Faeries A-Z
A Guide to Fairies
Writing Fairy Characters
Other Names for Fairies
Books About Faery
Best YA Fairy Books
Best YA Fantasy Series About the Fae
ANGELS AND DEMONS
A Glory of Angels
Angels and Demons Resource Post
Do You Give Angels Flaws or Not?
Unusual Angels
More:
Creating Creepy Creatures
Mythology Meme
Master Post of World Mythology, Creatures, and Folklore
Figures of Norse Mythology
Those Who Haunt the Earth
Writing Horror, Paranormal, and Supernatural
Genre: YA Supernatural
List of Mythical Creatures
Mythological Creature Picture Spam
How to Make Your Supernatural Characters Unique
Supernatural Theme Story
Myths and Urban Legends Masterpost
Original Gods, Goddesses, and Myths
World Building Basics: Myths and Legends
Mythical Creatures and Beings
Symbols by Word
Mythology Meme
Writing Paranormal Characters into the Real World

thewritingcafe is the most amazing resource for writing resources & advice in case you didn’t already know

sixpenceee:

thewritingcafe:

Another Halloween themed post.

Part I: Superstitions

GHOSTS AND SPIRITS

ZOMBIES

SHAPE SHIFTERS AND HOMINIDS

SEA CREATURES

VAMPIRES

AVIAN CREATURES

FAIRIES AND FAE

ANGELS AND DEMONS

More:

thewritingcafe is the most amazing resource for writing resources & advice in case you didn’t already know

October 2014
04
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sekigan:

dreams.png

sekigan:

dreams.png

September 2014
28
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fairandfinn asked

Do you have any advice for creating fantasy monsters from scratch?

characterandwritinghelp:

There is a lot to consider. Think about:

  • Where do they come from? What is their origin story? Are they a magical species, or a nonmagical creation? Were they brought to life in a lab? Did they evolve from something we might recognize?
  • What is their folklore? If they have been around for a long time, your monsters may be an entrenched part of your world’s folklore and mythology. What are the stories mothers tell their children about these monsters? Are there legends surrounding them?
  • Where do they live? If your monster was going to be featured in a zoo, what would they need to be happy? What is their habitat like?
  • How intelligent are they? How do they communicate? Do they have a language of their own? Do they have a form of government, or do they work on a pack/hivemind mentality? Do they use a spoken language/vocal cues, body language/visual cues, scent marking/smell cues, etc.?
  • What do they eat? How do they get it? Are they hunters, gatherers, foragers, scavengers, etc.?
  • How has the monster species changed and evolved since it was first created/discovered? Are there subspecies within the broader classification of [monster]?
  • Can they be domesticated? Why/why not? What do humans use them for? Can they be kept as pets, companions, hunting aids, guards, etc.?
  • What do they look like? Feathers? Fur? Skin? Scales? Something else? Are there regional/subspecies/other varieties that vary from the “normal” look?
  • How does it behave? Does it act differently around humans than it does around animals or other monsters? Is there a family dynamic? What does courting/mating/etc. look like? For that matter…
  • What about babies? Do they reproduce quickly with lots of offspring per birth, or do they reproduce slowly?
  • How about predators? Are they low on the food chain, or do they rule the roost? How do they fight off/avoid predators?
  • How do they get sick? Are they especially immune or susceptible to certain illnesses? Is there a disease that only these monsters can contract? Can it spread to other species?

Check out these other posts around the Tumblsphere:

-Headless

September 2014
28
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thewritingcafe:


Anonymous asked you:
Any advice for creating a creation myth for my fantasy world?

Part I: Creating a Religion
Part II: Religious Hierarchies
Part III: Pantheons, Deities, Mythologies, etc.
Part IV: Creating a Deity
Part V: Religious Sects
BONUS: Ceremonies (birth, death, naming, sacrificing, rites of passage)
WHEN?
When does your world believe the world was made? You don’t have to create a timeline, but you can. Your characters don’t even have to give an actual time period. If the creation myth is about the creation of humans rather than the world itself and if the story involves nearby mountains, they might say “before the mountains were here”.
You can get as specific as you want with the timeline. For example, someone studied the Bible and concluded that the earth was made in October in 4004 BCE.
Come up with different ways to measure the timeline of the creation myth in your world. If one world has three moons that represent three deities, they might believe that it took three thousand years to create the world, giving one thousand years to each moon/deity. Each thousand years could add something new to the world (the natural world (planets, stars, water, rock, etc.), living things (plants, animals, etc.), and magic or something).
WHAT HAPPENED?
It’s quite common for creation stories to start with “in the beginning there was X”. X can refer to a character, a place, nothing, darkness, silence, or anything else you want if it relates to the story. If you start with this structure, something needs to disrupt, change, or add to what was.
Creations can be accidental or intended. If creations are intended, come up with a reason for why they were intended. A deity might have made the world as a gift to another deity or they might have created a volcano as a prison to hold some type of creature that shoots up lava every now and then in an attempt to escape.
CHARACTERS INVOLVED
Literally anything can be a character in a creation myth. Water can interact with deities and animals can talk. Humans can reproduce asexually and giraffes can be stretched until they have long necks. 
If you have created deities, consider putting them into your creation myth. Create relationships between these deities and make sure the events of the creation myth have an impact on the deities as well.
Other times, the creation myth creates deities and other mythological or supernatural beings. In this case, some type of being who is above the created deities will need to exist.
EXPLANATIONS
The creation of the world is not the only thing that a creation myth can explain. They can explain a number of phenomena, such as rain, death, sunrises and sunsets, stars, mountains, and other parts of the natural world.
The creation myth does not even have to be about the creation of the whole world. It might be about the island where your characters live or it might just be about humans.

thewritingcafe:

Anonymous asked you:

Any advice for creating a creation myth for my fantasy world?

Part I: Creating a Religion

Part II: Religious Hierarchies

Part III: Pantheons, Deities, Mythologies, etc.

Part IV: Creating a Deity

Part V: Religious Sects

BONUS: Ceremonies (birth, death, naming, sacrificing, rites of passage)

WHEN?

When does your world believe the world was made? You don’t have to create a timeline, but you can. Your characters don’t even have to give an actual time period. If the creation myth is about the creation of humans rather than the world itself and if the story involves nearby mountains, they might say “before the mountains were here”.

You can get as specific as you want with the timeline. For example, someone studied the Bible and concluded that the earth was made in October in 4004 BCE.

Come up with different ways to measure the timeline of the creation myth in your world. If one world has three moons that represent three deities, they might believe that it took three thousand years to create the world, giving one thousand years to each moon/deity. Each thousand years could add something new to the world (the natural world (planets, stars, water, rock, etc.), living things (plants, animals, etc.), and magic or something).

WHAT HAPPENED?

It’s quite common for creation stories to start with “in the beginning there was X”. X can refer to a character, a place, nothing, darkness, silence, or anything else you want if it relates to the story. If you start with this structure, something needs to disrupt, change, or add to what was.

Creations can be accidental or intended. If creations are intended, come up with a reason for why they were intended. A deity might have made the world as a gift to another deity or they might have created a volcano as a prison to hold some type of creature that shoots up lava every now and then in an attempt to escape.

CHARACTERS INVOLVED

Literally anything can be a character in a creation myth. Water can interact with deities and animals can talk. Humans can reproduce asexually and giraffes can be stretched until they have long necks. 

If you have created deities, consider putting them into your creation myth. Create relationships between these deities and make sure the events of the creation myth have an impact on the deities as well.

Other times, the creation myth creates deities and other mythological or supernatural beings. In this case, some type of being who is above the created deities will need to exist.

EXPLANATIONS

The creation of the world is not the only thing that a creation myth can explain. They can explain a number of phenomena, such as rain, death, sunrises and sunsets, stars, mountains, and other parts of the natural world.

The creation myth does not even have to be about the creation of the whole world. It might be about the island where your characters live or it might just be about humans.

September 2014
06
Via   •   Source

Writing Traumatic Injuries References

alatar-and-pallando:

So, pretty frequently writers screw up when they write about injuries. People are clonked over the head, pass out for hours, and wake up with just a headache… Eragon breaks his wrist and it’s just fine within days… Wounds heal with nary a scar, ever…

I’m aiming to fix that.

Here are over 100 links covering just about every facet of traumatic injuries (physical, psychological, long-term), focusing mainly on burns, concussions, fractures, and lacerations. Now you can beat up your characters properly!

General resources

WebMD

Mayo Clinic first aid

Mayo Clinic diseases

First Aid

PubMed: The source for biomedical literature

Diagrams: Veins (towards heart), arteries (away from heart) bones, nervous system, brain

 

Burns

General overview: Includes degrees

Burn severity: Including how to estimate body area affected

Burn treatment: 1st, 2nd, and 3rd degrees

Smoke inhalation

Smoke inhalation treatment

Chemical burns

Hot tar burns

Sunburns

 

Incisions and Lacerations

Essentials of skin laceration repair (including stitching techniques)

When to stitch (Journal article—Doctors apparently usually go by experience on this)

More about when to stitch (Simple guide for moms)

Basic wound treatment

Incision vs. laceration: Most of the time (including in medical literature) they’re used synonymously, but eh.

Types of lacerations: Page has links to some particularly graphic images—beware!

How to stop bleeding: 1, 2, 3

Puncture wounds: Including a bit about what sort of wounds are most likely to become infected

More about puncture wounds

Wound assessment: A huge amount of information, including what the color of the flesh indicates, different kinds of things that ooze from a wound, and so much more.

Home treatment of gunshot wound, also basics
More about gunshot wounds, including medical procedures

Tourniquet use: Controversy around it, latest research

Location pain chart: Originally intended for tattoo pain, but pretty accurate for cuts

General note: Deeper=more serious. Elevate wounded limb so that gravity draws blood towards heart. Scalp wounds also bleed a lot but tend to be superficial. If it’s dirty, risk infection. If it hits the digestive system and you don’t die immediately, infection’ll probably kill you. Don’t forget the possibility of tetanus! If a wound is positioned such that movement would cause the wound to gape open (i.e. horizontally across the knee) it’s harder to keep it closed and may take longer for it to heal.

 

Broken bones

Types of fractures

Setting a broken bone when no doctor is available

Healing time of common fractures

Broken wrists

Broken ankles/feet

Fractured vertebrae: Neck (1, 2), back

Types of casts

Splints

Fracture complications

Broken noses

Broken digits: Fingers and toes

General notes: If it’s a compound fracture (bone poking through) good luck fixing it on your own. If the bone is in multiple pieces, surgery is necessary to fix it—probably can’t reduce (“set”) it from the outside. Older people heal more slowly. It’s possible for bones to “heal” crooked and cause long-term problems and joint pain. Consider damage to nearby nerves, muscle, and blood vessels.

 

Concussions

General overview

Types of concussions 1, 2

Concussion complications

Mild Brain Injuries: The next step up from most severe type of concussion, Grade 3

Post-concussion syndrome

Second impact syndrome: When a second blow delivered before recovering from the initial concussion has catastrophic effects. Apparently rare.

Recovering from a concussion

Symptoms: Scroll about halfway down the page for the most severe symptoms

Whiplash

General notes: If you pass out, even for a few seconds, it’s serious. If you have multiple concussions over a lifetime, they will be progressively more serious. Symptoms can linger for a long time.




Character reaction:

Shock (general)

Physical shock: 1, 2

Fight-or-flight response: 1, 2

Long-term emotional trauma: 1 (Includes symptoms), 2

First aid for emotional trauma

 

Treatment (drugs)

WebMD painkiller guide

 

Treatment (herbs)

1, 2, 3, 4

 

Miscellany

Snake bites: No, you don’t suck the venom out or apply tourniquettes

Frostbite

Frostbite treatment

Severe frostbite treatment

When frostbite sets in: A handy chart for how long your characters have outside at various temperatures and wind speeds before they get frostbitten

First aid myths: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 Includes the ones about buttering burns and putting snow on frostbite.

Poisons: Why inducing vomiting is a bad idea

Poisonous plants

Dislocations: Symptoms 1, 2; treatment. General notes: Repeated dislocations of same joint may lead to permanent tissue damage and may cause or be symptomatic of weakened ligaments. Docs recommend against trying to reduce (put back) dislocated joint on your own, though information about how to do it is easily found online.

Muscular strains

Joint sprain

Resuscitation after near-drowning: 1, 2

Current CPR practices: We don’t do mouth-to-mouth anymore.

The DSM IV, for all your mental illness needs.

 

Electrical shock

Human response to electrical shock: Includes handy-dandy voltage chart

Length of contact needed at different voltages to cause injury

Evaluation protocol for electric shock injury

Neurological complications

Electrical and lightning injury

Cardiac complications

Delayed effects and a good general summary

Acquired savant syndrome: Brain injuries (including a lightning strike) triggering development of amazing artistic and other abilities

 

Please don’t repost! You can find the original document (also created by me) here.

September 2014
05
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urocy0n:

Bat-Eared Fox (Otocyon Megalotis)

urocy0n:

Bat-Eared Fox (Otocyon Megalotis)

September 2014
04
Via   •   Source

thefrogman:

[video] [h/t: sizvideos]

September 2014
02
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deanbennie:

finding a new favorite character like

image

September 2014
02
Via   •   Source

zeekubeast:

wanting to draw things but not having the energy to put effort into drawings

image

September 2014
01
Via   •   Source

howtofightwrite:

Explaining sword terminology: Longsword, greatsword, arming sword, broadsword? via Skallagrim